Stride Length

Stride length is the distance between heel strikes of two consecutive steps with the same foot during one gait cycle. Stride length is related to walking speed (speed = 2 x cadence x stride length) and is correlated with height.

 

Table 12: Normalized* normative values of stride length for healthy adults

Age (years)

Gender

Stride Length (m)

20-29

Male

1.28

Female

1.15

30-30

Male

1.29

Female

1.16

40-49

Male

1.32

Female

1.12

50-59

Male

1.32

Female

1.18

60-69

Male

1.23

Female

1.15

70-89

Male

1.01

Female

0.92

* normalized stride length = stride length/(body height/mean body height)

Fang X, Liu C, Jiang Z. 2018 Reference values of gait using APDM movement monitoring inertial sensor system. R. Soc. open sci.5: 170818. http://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rsos.170818

 

Table 13: Normative values of stride length for non-diseased elderly men and women

Age (years)

Gender

Stride Length (m)

70-74

Male

1.35

Female

1.23

75-79

Male

1.32

Female

1.15

80-84

Male

1.27

Female

1.12

>85

Male

1.19

Female

1.10

Oh-Park, M., Holtzer, R., Xue, X., & Verghese, J. (2010). Conventional and robust quantitative gait norms in community-dwelling older adults. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 58(8), 1512–1518. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1532-5415.2010.02962.x

 

Stride length changes for stability - Decreasing stride length and increasing walking speed can lead to better stability in the anterior-posterior plane. Increasing cadence can lead to better medial-lateral stability.

Hak L, Houdijk H, Beek PJ, van Diee¨n JH (2013). Steps to Take to Enhance Gait Stability: The Effect of Stride Frequency, Stride Length, and Walking Speed on Local Dynamic Stability and Margins of Stability. PLoS ONE 8(12): e82842. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0082842

 

The effect of stride length on low back pain - With increasing walking speed, and thus increasing stride length, relative rotations in the pelvis and thorax increase, leading to larger spinal rotations. A person with low back pain may therefore walk slower or with shorter strides.

Huang, Y, Meijer OG, Lin, J, et al. (2010). The effects of stride length and stride frequency on trunk coordination in human walking. Gait & Posture 31(4) 444-449. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gaitpost.2010.01.019

 

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